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white collar crimes Archives

Are corporate crimes and white collar crimes the same?

The terms "corporate crime" and "white collar crimes" are both used interchangeably as they are both non-violent crimes related to some financial activity. Additionally, the type of charges are often similar, including but not limited to, embezzlement, fraud, bribery and money laundering. There are some key differences between the two that revolve around who benefits from the crime and who pays for it. These differences are very important to understand for Ohio residents facing criminal charges.

What's the time limit for white collar criminal charges?

When one has been charged with committing a white collar crime, it is the prosecutor's job to prove every element of the case and rebut the defenses the accused puts forth. This also means it is their duty to ensure that the statute of limitations has not run on the case.

What must be shown to prove money-laundering?

When a prosecutor is charging an individual with committing a white-collar crime, they must prove all the elements of the crime were committed by the person being accused of it. Different crimes have different intent requirements that must be fulfilled and, if they are not, the crime cannot be proven. For example, a string of judgments in 2008 clarified the requirements of the federal crime of money laundering.

What is computer fraud?

Ohio residents, like their counterparts across the country, use their computers for practically every thing, from running their business to ordering their groceries. With so much information out there on the Internet and the use so rampant, it is inevitable that crimes related to computers also pop-up. But not all computer crimes are the same and when someone finds themselves facing white-collar criminal charges related to computer fraud, it is important to understand what the charges are so one can defend themselves accordingly.

Judges becoming harsher in dealing with white-collar crimes

White collar crimes have established a reputation of being victimless-though the victims lose a chunk of their live savings, the perpetrator does not come face to face with their victims as one would if accused of robbery or assault. Perpetrators know that there are harming the market, not specific identified victims. This is why the psychology of the crime is different-there is no signal to the brain that a crime is going to be committed. Rather, there is a gradual slipping over the line until one does not even realize what they have done.

Thirteen indicted on fraud charges

When someone knowingly executes or attempts to execute a plan that defrauds a financial institution or obtains the money, credit, funds or property owned or under the control of a financial institution by using fraudulent means or by using fraudulent misrepresentation, they may find themselves facing bank fraud charges. These charges carry with them serious penalties, including a fine that is no more than $1,000,000, and could include imprisonment of up to 30 years.

What is wire fraud?

We've heard of the terms "phishing" and "spamming" before but perhaps without understanding that they represent forms of fraud that can be punishable with serious penalties. Specifically, since these forms of actions are conducted over interstate wires, they are considered forms of wire fraud.

Understand the difference between tax evasion and avoidance

Tax laws are complicated, and Cincinnati residents often spend the whole year preparing for the next tax season. Many business owners employ various strategies to reduce their tax bill, and while some strategies are considered legal, others may be illegal and could lead to white collar criminal charges.

Experienced counsel could help fight identity theft penalties

People facing criminal charges often feel like they have been punished without ever even going through the criminal justice system. Those who have been through it and are cleared of any wrongdoing feel like they have been penalized even though they are not guilty. Beginning from the initial arrest down to the time one is acquitted, people face many repercussions socially, financially, emotionally or even physically.

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